Department of Forestry and Wildlife Management
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DEPARTMENT OF FORESTRY AND WILDLIFE MANAGEMENT

      Preamble

The Department of Forestry and Wildlife Management was one of the earliest department created when the University of Agriculture, Abeokuta came into  being in January 1988.  On October 1, 1994, the Department of Aquaculture and Fisheries and Forestry and Wildlife Management were created out of the old Forestry, Fisheries and Wildlife Management Department.

The Department now runs a 5-year Bachelor’s degree programme in Forestry and Wildlife Management.  The Postgraduate degree programme at Masters and Ph.D. levels started in 1992.  The Department thereby, has consolidated the gains of the first degree with the inception of the postgraduate programme.

7.3.2      Philosophy 

The primary philosophy that guides the training of students is the production of skilled manpower that is adequately furnished with the comprehensive information required, for engaging in Forestry and Wildlife management in an environment characterized by rural setting and adequate land endowment.  Such knowledgeably professional manpower has to be produced in an atmosphere with the widest possible human and material resources, through the adoption of effective techniques of instruction, and exposure to the actual practice of forestry. Consequently, there are opportunities for formal training at the Undergraduate and Postgraduate levels for the acquisition of basic and higher degrees respectively.

These training programmes are mounted through classroom instruction, laboratory practicals, field demonstration, and workshop practice.

 

7.3.3      Objectives of the Programme

To produce graduates with sufficient practical background to create employment from utilisation of Forestry  and Wildlife Resources.  The graduates are also expected to be able to undertake local sourcing of industrial raw materials, to produce animal protein through domestication and ranching of farm wildlife and also engage in Food production through agroforestry.

 

To produce the required manpower which will not only be used in staffing Forestry and wildlife establishments nationally but which also would be able to carry out relevant, mission oriented researches into all aspects of forestry and Wildlife, the yet unexplored benefits and products which can serve as bases for newer industries


7.3.4      Departmental Postgraduate Programmes

The Department recognises the peculiarities of forestry and wildlife as well as the need to run separate programmes at postgraduate level. Therefore, all postgraduate programmes ranging from Postgraduate diploma, Masters and Doctor of Philosophy in various aspect of Forestry and Wildlife Sciences are available in the department.

Arrangement has been concluded on the development of Postgraduate Diploma in Forest Resources Management; Wildlife and Ecotourism and Biodiversity Management.

Master of Forestry (M.F.) and Master of Wildlife Management (M.WM) programmes are for a period of two years, and consists of two semesters of lectures and two semesters of research period for a study project and written dissertation.  Admission is normally open to University graduates in Forestry and Wildlife Management, Agriculture, the Biological Sciences or any other relevant discipline. This programme is essentially an advanced training course for specialist workers.  Individual student may be required to offer some prescribed courses without which they cannot graduate.

Master of Forestry (M.F.) courses are available in the following areas of specialization:

Forest Economics and Management                                                      

Agroforestry

Forest Ecology and Conservation                                                                             

Biometry

Master of Wildlife Management (M.WM.) courses are available in three areas of specialization:

Wildlife Management and Conservation

Wildlife Domestication and Production

Wildlife Park Planning and Recreation Development.

Wildlife Ecology and Conservation

Master of Wood Science (MWS) courses are available in the following areas of specialization

Wood Utilization and Protection

Pulp and Paper

Forest Operations

Curriculum for Wildlife Ecology and Conservation is still being processed.

A number of Core; University; College courses; Electives and Seminar presentations are compulsory for all candidates.  Each of the specialist areas, however, offers more courses than the required minimum so that candidates may make a further selection from within their chosen area. Courses given in this Department are listed as follows:

 

7.3.5      Courses in Forestry

A student must take and passed all the prescribed number of courses equivalent to the unit allotted to each categories of courses below before minimum graduation requirements can be said to have been met.

Course Title

Unit

University Course

4

College Courses

6

Core Courses

12

Electives

7

Thesis Research

6

Seminar

2

Minimum Course Units for Graduation

37

 

 

Course Code

Course Title

Abbreviation

Unit

University Course

CSC 801

Use of Computer in Research

USEOCOMP

4

College Courses

FRM 814

Advanced Remote Sensing and Photogrametry

ADRESEPH

3

WMA 817

Advanced Methods of  Water Quality Assessment & Pollution Control

WMATQASS

3

Forest Economics Core Courses

FRM 800

Advance Biometry

ADVABIOM

3

FRM 801

Production Analysis in Forestry Planning and Control of Forestry Operations

PRODANFO

3

FRM 802

Planning and Control of Forestry

PLCOFORO

3

FRM 803

Advanced Resource Management and Economics

ADREMAEC

3

FRM 897

Seminar I

SEMINARI

1

FRM 898

Seminar II

SEMINAII

1

FRM 899

Dissertation

DISSERTN

6

Forest Ecology and conservation Core Courses

FRM 804

Advanced Forest Ecology

ADVAFOEC

3

FRM 805

Forest Tree Genetics: Exploration and Utilization

FOTGEXCU

3

FRM 808

Forest Inventory and Growth

FORTINGR

3

FRM 813

Control and Management of Ecological Disasters

COMAECDI

3

FRM 897

Seminar I

SEMINARI

1

FRM 898

Seminar II

SEMINAII

1

FRM 899

Dissertation

DISSERTN

6

Agroforestry Core Courses

FRM 815

Agroforestry Components Interactions

AGROCOIN

3

FRM 816

Land Use Analysis and Classification

LAUSANCL

3

FRM 817

Soil and Water Management in Agroforestry System

SOWMAGSY

3

FRM 818

Socio-Economic Aspects of Agroforestry

SOECASAG

3

FRM 897

Seminar I

SEMINARI

1

FRM 898

Seminar II

SEMINAII

1

FRM 899

Dissertation

DISSERTN

6

Biometry Core Courses

FRM 801

Production Analysis in Forestry Planning and Control of Forestry Operations

PRODANFO

3

FRM 819

Resource Inventory Analysis

RESOINAN

3

FRM 820

Modeling

MODELLNG

3

FRM 821

Agroforestry Research Methodology and  Field Experimentation

AGFREMFE

3

FRM 897

Seminar I

SEMINARI

1

FRM 898

Seminar II

SEMINAII

1

FRM 899

Dissertation

DISSERTN

6

Electives

FRM 806

Forest Watershed Management

FOWAMANA

3

FRM 807

Forest Recreation Planning

 

3

FRM 809

Forest Management and Evaluation

FORTMAVA

3

FRM 810

Forest Machinery

FORTMACH

3

FRM811

Advanced Silviculture

ADVASILU

3

FRM 812

Advanced Forest Protection

ADVAFOPR

3

 

 

7.3.6      Courses in Wood Science

Course Code

Course Title

Abbreviation

Unit

WSC 800

Advanced Mechanical Wood Processing

 

3

WSC 802

Wood Physics

WOODPHSC

3

WSC 804

Chemistry of Wood

CHEMWOOD

3

WSC 808

Pulp and Paper Technology

PUPATECH

3

WSC 897

Seminar I

SEMINARI

1

WSC 898

Seminar II

SEMINAII

1

WSC 899

Dissertation

DISSERTN

6

Electives

WSC 801

Research Methods in Wood Anatomy

REMEWOAN

3

 

Advanced Forest Operations

 

3

WSC 805

Timber Engineering

TIMBENGN

3

WSC 807

Wood Deterioration and Preservation

WODEAPRE

3

WSC 809

Lumber Manufacturing

LUMBMANU

3

 

 

7.3.7      Courses in Wildlife

A student must take and passed all the prescribed number of courses equivalent to the unit allotted to each categories of courses below before minimum graduation requirements can be said to have been met.

Course Title

Unit

University Course

4

College Courses

6

Core Courses

12

Electives

4

Thesis Research

6

Seminar

2

Minimum Graduation Requirements

34

 

 

List of Courses

Course Code

Course Title

Abbreviation

Unit

University Course

CSC 801

Use of Computer in Research

USEOCOMP

4

College Courses

FRM 814

Advanced Remote Sensing and Photogrametry

ADRESEPH

3

WMA 817

Advanced Methods of  Water Quality Assessment & Pollution Control

WMATQASS

3

Wildlife Ecology and Management Option

WLM 800

Fire Ecology

FIREECOL

3

WLM 801

Vertebrate Ecology

VERTECOL

3

WLM 802

Problems in Wildlife Management

PROBWLMG

3

WLM 803

Systematic Ormithology

SYSTORNI

3

WLM 804

Environmental Impact Analysis of Wildlife Protected-Areas

ENMANWPA

3

FRM 800

Advance Biometry

ADVABIOM

3

WLM 897

Seminar I

SEMINARI

1

WLM 898

Seminar II

SEMINAII

1

WLM 899

Dissertation

DISSERTN

6

Wildlife Domestication and Production Option

WLM 805

Wildlife Production Techniques

WLPRTECH

3

WLM 806

Vertebrate Ethology

VERTETNG

3

WLM 808

Wildlife Nutrition

WILDNUTN

3

WLM 809

Comparative Pathology

COMPPATO

3

FRM 800

Advance Biometry

ADVABIOM

3

WLM 897

Seminar I

SEMINARI

1

WLM 898

Seminar II

SEMINAII

1

WLM 899

Dissertation

DISSERTN

6

Wildlife Park Planning and Recreation Development Option

WLM 810

Park Design Recreation Resources Development

PADGREDE

3

WLM 812

Zoo and Museum Techniques

ZOMUTECH

3

WLM 814

Wildlife Policy and Law Enforcement

WDPOLWEN

3

FRM 800

Advance Biometry

ADVABIOM

3

WLM 897

Seminar I

SEMINARI

1

WLM 898

Seminar II

SEMINAII

1

WLM 899

Dissertation

DISSERTN

6

 

Electives

Course Code

Course Title

Abbreviation

Unit

Wildlife Ecology and Management Option

WLM 805

Wildlife Production Techniques

WLPRTECH

3

WLM 810

Park Design Recreation Resources Development

PADGREDE

3

WLM 813

Communication in Conservation

COMMCONS

3

WLM 814

Wildlife Policy and Law Enforcement

WDPOLWEN

3

WLM 815

Field and Laboratory Methods

FLDLAMTD

3

WLM 816

Ecosystem Approach to Range Management

ECOAPRMG

3

Wildlife Domestication and Production Option

WLM 802

Problems in Wildlife Management

PROBWLMG

3

WLM 813

Communication in Conservation

COMMCONS

3

WLM 814

Wildlife Policy and Law Enforcement

WDPOLWEN

3

WLM 815

Field and Laboratory Methods

FLDLAMTD

3

WLM 816

Ecosystem Approach to Range Management

ECOAPRMG

3

WLM 817

Physiological Ecology of Wildlife Species

PHECOWLS

3

Wildlife Park Planning and Recreation Development Option

WLM 800

Fire Ecology

FIREECOL

3

WLM 802

Problems in Wildlife Management

PROBWLMG

3

WLM 815

Field and Laboratory Methods

FLDLAMTD

3

WLM 816

Ecosystem Approach to Range Management

ECOAPRMG

3

WLM 818

Travel and Tourism

TRAVTOUR

3

WLM 819

Recreation System Planning

RECSYSPL

3

 

 

 

 

7.3.8      Doctor of Philosophy (Ph.D.)

The Doctor of Philosophy (Ph.D.) in various aspects of Forestry and Wildlife requires a minimum of six semesters full-time or ten semesters for part-time study.  Course work and examinations may be required but the principal examination is based on the thesis, which must show evidence of the candidate's ability to draw significant conclusions from his own research.  Admission to the course is normally by transfer from the Masters programme.

Ph.D. is basically a research degree in specialised areas of Forest and Wildlife Science.  There may be course work, which will vary depending on the background of the candidate but would contain the relevant courses that have not been taken at Master of Forest Science degree level and in some cases may include courses in related basic sciences.

 

7.3.9      Requirements for Award of Postgraduate Degrees

The Master’s and Doctorate degree programmes of the Federal University of Agriculture, Abeokuta shall normally consist of an approved combination of courses, laboratory practicals and field practical work, with a research project, which shall be written up as a thesis or dissertation.

 

Applications for the Registration of Titles of Theses and the appointment of External Examiners shall be submitted to the Board of the Postgraduate School not earlier than six months and not later than three months before the completion of the Programme for both the Full-time and Part-time students.

Copies of the draft thesis shall be submitted through the College Dean to the Dean of the Postgraduate School at least three months before the expected completion of the Programme.  The Dean of the Postgraduate School shall send the draft copies of the thesis to the External Examiner and Supervisors for review in preparation for the viva-voce or the thesis on a date to be communicated to the External Examiner.

The Examiners shall send their reports on the draft thesis to the Dean of the Postgraduate School who shall arrange for the conduct of the oral examination, only if the External Examiner and at least two Internal Examiners certify that the thesis has merit.  Before a candidate is presented for oral examination of his thesis, he shall produce a written certification signed by all his supervisors that his research work has been satisfactorily completed.

Each student shall have an Examination Panel, which shall be approved by Senate on the recommendation of the Board of the Postgraduate School.  The composition shall be:

Head of Department (Chairman)

External Examiner

Major Supervisor (if not the Head of Department)

One other Internal Examiner from a related discipline outside the Department (To be nominated by the Dean of College).

 

[One nominee from the Secretariat of the Postgraduate School shall be in attendance during the examination that shall be open to the University Community].

Soon after the completion of the oral examination, a report on the examination written on the appropriate report form shall be submitted through the College Dean to the Dean of the Postgraduate School for processing.

At the end of the examination, the examiners shall recommend any of the following as may be        appropriate:

That the degree be awarded without further amendments to the thesis

That the degree be awarded after some corrections of amendments have been made (and shall list those items to be corrected/amended)

That the thesis be re-examined after major corrections/revisions would have been carried out (and they shall specify the defects)

That the degree be not awarded (and they shall give detailed reasons).

[When minor corrections are recommended, all the internal examiners shall be expected to go through the revised copy and shall certify the satisfactory completion of the recommended corrections

If the candidate is successful in his Examination, he shall be required to make the necessary corrections/amendments as recommended by the Examination Panel within three months, to the satisfaction of the internal examiners who shall certify that all corrections have been satisfactorily effected before the final copies are type printed and appropriately bound.  Six copies of the bound thesis shall be submitted to the Dean of the Postgraduate School who shall distribute the copies as follows:

One copy to the University Library                                           One copy to the College Library

One copy to the Postgraduate School                                     One copy to the Department

One copy to the Major Supervisor                                           One copy to the Student.

If the thesis is not considered to be of sufficient merit for the specified degree, the candidate shall have six months within which to bring the work to the quality expected.

If the candidate fails the oral examination, he shall not be represented for a repeat examination until after six months of the first attempt.

The thesis of a candidate may not include materials already submitted for the award of a degree in any other University, and shall not be part of a previous thesis for a higher degree of the Fedral University of Agriculture, Abeokuta.

A candidate shall not be qualified for the award of a Master's or Doctorate Degree until he has passed all the prescribed courses, submitted a satisfactory thesis, passed his oral examination and spent not less than the minimum number nor more than the maximum number of semesters stipulated for the programme.

 

The effective date of the award of the degree shall be the date of the successful oral defence of the thesis.

 

7.3.10    Synopsis of Courses

FORESTRY ECONOMICS AND MANAGEMENT OPTION

FRM 800 - Advanced Biometry (Core) 3 Units

Sampling methods and principles of regression analysis as applied to forest resources and the biological sciences, matrix algebra of relevance to regression analysis, algebra and inference of multiple linear and curvilinear regression, applications to forestry and related field, computer programming exercise, parametric and non-parametric methods, design of experiments.

 

FRM 801 - Production Analysis in Forestry (Core) 3 Units

Concepts and procedures used in the evaluation of timber production and forest production manufacturing, organisation work measurement, inventory control, capital budgeting, cost control, network analysis and schematic models.

 

FRM 802 - Planning and Control of Forestry Operations (Core) 3 Units

Application of scientific methods to management decision, problems of forestry operations, Mathematical programming, Markov processes, wating-line analysis sequencing, simulation and competitive strategies.

FRM 803 - Advanced Resource Management and Economics (Core) 3 Units

Microeconomics of forest resources management and policy analysis, capital investment analysis, financial maturity models, timber harvesting scheduling models, capital replacement models, cost-benefit analysis, economics of multiple-use management of forest resources with emphasis on non-market benefits from the forest, advantages and disadvantages of alternative models for estimating recreation, wildlife and other non-market benefits.

Forest Ecology and Conservation Option

FRM 804 - Advanced Forest Ecology (Core) 3 Units

Qualitative and quantitative vegetation survey and analysis, advantages and disadvantages of each technique, Methods of estimating primary productivity of forests with particular reference to its biological and physical basis, biomass and rates of production in forest ecosystems, nutrient cycling, ecological evaluation.

 

FRM 805 - Forest Tree Breeding and Genetics (Core) 3 Units

An advanced course in forest biology dealing with variation, selection and breeding in tree improvement, forest tree genealogy and advanced problem in tree improvement, in situ and ex-situ conservation of forest genetic resources, germplasm exploration and utilisation in forestry.

 

FRM 808 - Forest Inventory and Growth (Core) 3 Units

Principles and exploration in details of approaches to inventory, sampling and growth, determination of increment, growth and yield evaluation.

 

FRM 813 - Control and Management of Ecological Disasters (Core) 3 Units                                 Types of ecological disasters - flood, erosion, desertification, drought, hurricane, etc.  Prevention of disasters and amelioration techniques, e.g. sand dune fixation.

 

FRM 814 - Advanced Remote Sensing and Photogrammetry (Core) 3 Units

Advanced photographic and non-photographic systems, new applications of colour and colour infrared aerial photography, study of film characteristic curves and filters, 35mm and 70mm aerial photography, computerised timber type mapping and use of aerial photo volume tables.

 

Agroforestry Option

FRM 821 - Agroforestry Research Methodology and Field Experimentation (Core) 3 Units

Diagnosis and Design Methodology; Introduction of Diagnosis and Design and why Diagnosis and Design, characteristics of good agroforestry design productivity, sustainability, adaptability, key features of Diagnosis and Design.  Basic stages and procedures, pre-diagnostic stage, planning the study, regional reconnaissance, identification and preliminary description of land-use systems, site selection, diagnostic stage, diagnostic survey, diagnostic analysis and specification for appropriate intervention, technology design stage, planning stage, stage of knowledge review and assessment of research needs, research and extension plan, implementation stage, Experimental design principles of field experimentation, replication, randomisation, local control, analysis of variance, assumptions underling the ANOVA model.

 

FRM 815 - Agroforestry Component Interactions (Core) 3 Units

Definition, productive and service roles, biological characterisation, genetic evaluation of Multipurpose tree (MPTS).  Selection of tree/crop/fodder combination, factors to be considered, tree crops, agricultural crops, animal classes and types of pastures.  Component interaction in different ecological zones, trees/crop/pasture/animals, positive and negative interactions.  Nutrient cycling in component systems dynamics of crop residues, animal waste, coppicing nitrogen fixation etc. Case studies of tree/crop/pasture/animal component combination.

 

FRM 816 - Land-Use Analysis and Classification (Core) 3 Units

Justification and objectives of land-use analysis and classification, criteria and systems of land capability and land-use in Nigeria.  Policy factors and issues, national and regional, land-use classification systems used in the world FAO, USAID, Ruthernbug etc.  Evaluation of soil resources for different land-use practices in relation to soil and water conservation, field mapping and evaluation of selected sites/areas.  Land capability classification - problems and potentials.

 

FRM 817 - Soil and Water Management in Agroforestry System (Core) 3 Units

Morphological, physical, chemical and biological properties of humid, sub-humid, semi-arid and arid soils, Tropical soils and their management under different farming systems, shifting cultivation, plantation agriculture, forestry multiple, cropping, taungya system integrated crop/tree, tree/animal and crop/animal/tree production systems for control of soil erosion, maintenance of soil fertility, soil moisture conservation, flood control and soil water harvesting.  Nutrient recycling under crop/tree/animal/tree; crop/animal/tree, fertilizer use in the agroforestry systems.

 

FRM 818 - Socio-Economic Aspects of Agroforestry (Core) 3 Units

Relation between human population, productive resources, technology and environment, role of agriculture and agroforestry in solving national and regional economic problems.  Basic economic principles, allocation of scarce resource among competing choices, optimising critter, comparative advantage, diminishing returns, substitution of products and resources, cost analysis, opportunity costs, analytical framework; Unit (Micro-macro), client, time, period, ex ante/ex post, etc.  Data collection methods with examples, data requirement and reliability, use of secondary service, informal and formal surveys, monitoring study, "Case" study, experimental results.

 

Forest Biometry Option

FRM 819 - Resource Inventory Analysis (Core)   3 Units

Quantitative and qualitative sampling of forest resources including timber, wildlife and fish, inventory instruments and their use.

 

FRM 820 - Modelling (Core)  3 Units

Review of modelling philosophy - distribution functions and the application of their parameters for biological interpretation.  Test for normality.  Use of specialised application packages for data analysis.

 

FRM 806 - Forest Watershed Management (Elective)     3 Units

Role of forests in water cycle, effects of logging, mining and other forestland uses on water resources.

 

FRM 807 - Forest Recreation Planning (Elective) 3 Units

Methods of measuring, analysing and forecasting recreational use of forestlands, concepts of planning and their application to forest recreation management.

 

FRM 809 - Forest Management and Valuation (Elective) 3 Units

Managing forest properties for sustained yield of timber products, determination of annual cut and effect of taxation, evaluating forest investments, preparation of management plans.

FRM 810 - Forest Machinery (Elective) 3 Units

Power sources for forest operations, construction principles, testing and rating, design and use of forest machinery, power requirements, selection and engineering aspects of machinery systems designs.

 

FRM 811 - Advanced Silviculture (Elective)          3 Units

Applied silvicultural practices and results of current silvicultural research in important forest types of the country.

 

FRM 812 - Advanced Forest Protection (Elective) 3 Units

Forest relationships and control of major tropical forest pests and diseases, fire protection, case studies of selected problems.

FRM 899 - Special Study: Thesis Research (Elective)        6 Units

Research projects on an approved topic leading to a dissertation.

 

FRM 897 and 898 - Seminar -                                                       2 Units

 

MASTER OF WOOD SCIENCE

WSC 800 – Advanced Mechanical Wood Processing (Core) 3 Units

The mechanical properties of wood and wood composites and their use in structural applications, the relationship of mechanical and physical properties to basic processing techniques.

 

WSC 802 - Wood Physics (Core) 3 Units

Study and evaluation of non-mechanical physical properties of wood, principally response to liquids, vibrational simulation, heat, electricity and ionising radiation.

 

WSC 804 - Chemistry of Wood (Core) 3 Units

Chemical composition of wood, structure, reactions and derivatives of wood and cellulose, chemistry of lignin, hemicelluloses and related compounds.  The extraneous components of wood, extension of elementary principles to application of physical, organic and polymer chemistry in forest products utilisation.

 

WSC 808 - Pulp and Paper Technology (Core) 3 Units

Physical and Chemical properties of wood in relation of pulping, chemicals used in pulping, paper manufacturing.

 

ELECTIVES

WSC 801 - Research Methods in Wood Anatomy (Elective) 3 Units

Preparation of woody tissue for light microscopic examination and recording, including micro-techniques and photomicrograph methods, introduction to electron microscopy and interpretation of wood ultrastructure and its effect on wood properties.

 

WSC 803 – Advanced Forest Operation (Elective) 3 Units

Harvesting and transportation systems, labour in the preparation of plans and work study, ergonomics and economics of forest operations.

WSC 806 - Wood Deterioration and Preservation (Elective) 3 Units

Natural deterioration of wood by fungi and insects, types of decay organisms, decay conditions, mechanisms and consequences, alternatives for wood protection against deterioration, chemicals used for wood preservation and techniques employed for applying wood preservatives.

 

WSC 807 - Lumber Manufacturing (Elective) 3 Units

Industrial methods and equipment used in the manufacture of lumber, modern milling and marketing practice, sawmill analysis, techniques, saw doctoring and lumber grading.

 

WSC 899 - Special Study: Thesis Research (Elective) 6 Units

Research projects on an approved topic leading to a dissertation.

 

WSC 897 and 898 - Seminar - 2 Units

 

MASTER OF WILDLIFE MANAGEMENT

WLM 800 - Fire Ecology (3 Units)

Principles governing fire and natural phenomenon.  Significance in the evolution of vegetation, adaptations to environment, fire as a management tool, fire ratings.

 

WLM 801 - Vertebrate Ecology (3 Units)

Ecology of the individual, population and ecosystem, epistemology of major ecological concepts.  Niche.  Theory evolved in the study of vertebrates.

 

WLM 802 - Problems in Wildlife Management (2 Units)

Individual study and research on selected problem approved by graduate adviser.  Problem to be addressed could be on human dimension aspect of Wildlife Management.  Wildlife habitats, protected or no-protected sites, interpretation and extension services.

 

WLM 803 - Systematic Ornithology (3 Units)

Birds of the world, diversity, radiation, adaptation, distribution and past history.  Contrasts both between the taxa and between the continental avifaunas.  Identification of avian-species by size, form and sound.

 

WLM 804 - Environmental Impact Analysis of Wildlife Protected Areas (3 Units)

Analysis and critique of contemporary environmental analysis methods in current use, environmental impact statements.  National policies, political, social and legal ramifications as related to utilization.

 

FRM 800 - Advanced Biometry (3 Units)

Sampling methods and principles of regression analysis as applied to forest resources and the biological sciences, matrix algebra of relevance to regression analysis, algebra and inference of multiple linear and curvilinear regression, applications to forestry and related field, computer programming exercise, parametric and non-parametric methods, design of experiments.

 

WLM 805 - Wildlife Production Techniques (3 Units)

Health and Welfare requirements of wildlife species in captivity.  Domestication and multiplication techniques for selected African mammals, birds and reptiles.  Ranching techniques.

 

WLM 806 - Vertebrate Ethnology (2 Units)

Phylogenic evolution of behaviour, the behaviour patterns that animals exhibit for functioning in their environments.  Social organisation problems of everyday activities breeding seasons, agnostic behaviour, territoriality and population integration, reproductive behaviours predator-prey relations, domestication.

 

WLM 807 - Animal Breeding (3 Units)

Concepts from Mendelian, population and quantitative genetics, heritability, selection response, selection criterion, selection index, genetic relationship, inbreeding, amaturing systems, hybrid vigour and genetic-environmental interaction applied to animal breeding and to production systems.

 

WLM 808 - Wildlife Nutrition (3 Units)

Current fundamental concepts in protein and energy metabolism relating to nutrients required for maintenance, growth and development of animals.

 

WLM 809 - Comparative Pathology (2 Units)

Pathology of laboratory animals, primates, fish and marine animals.

 

WLM 810 - Park Design and Recreation Resources Development (3 Units)

Fundamental of the recreation planning process, historical prospective and objective of planning models, major component analysis including public involvement, resource evaluation, demand analysis, classification of system and standards.

 

WLM 812 - Zoo and Museum Techniques (2 Units)

Health and welfare requirements of wildlife species on captivity.  Zoo design and layout, museum techniques, principles of collecting preserving and existing animal specimens in museum for educational purposes.

 

WLM 813 - Communication in Conservation (3 Units)

Conservation education, extension services and park interpretative techniques.  Setting up of effective learning milieu in rural areas, motivation principles of adult learning.  Communication and diffusion processes, practice of selected kindred education methods.

 

WLM 814 - Wildlife Policy and Law Enforcement (2 Units)

Analysis of present wildlife conservation policy identification and justification of policy for update.  Role of law enforcement and machinery for effective wildlife management and conservation. History and development of law and relationship to present policies.  Organisation, operations and duties of personnel.

 

WLM 815 - Field and Laboratory Methods (2 Units)

Experiences in field studies, organising field notes collecting and preserving wildlife for teaching and museum purposes. Methods of mounting live animals and for identifying animals collected. Training in preparation of skeletons, animal mounts, models diorama and other exhibits.

 

WLM 816 - Ecosystem Approach to Range Management (3 Units)

The ruche concept, populations communities, energy flow, nutrient cycle on the ecosystem, natural regulation of animal numbers, adaptation, man's role in biological communities.

 

WLM 817 - Physiological Ecology of Wildlife Species (2 Units)

Effects and limitation of temperature, photoperiod and other environmental factors in the distribution and abundance of animals, comparative behavioural and physiological adjustments to environment as an evolutionary response, physiological indices of reproduction, changes in metabolites, hepatic and extra-hepatic enzymes of wild animals.

 

WLM 818 - Travel and Tourism (2 Units)

Tourism and recreational travel, origins, present characteristics and societal impacts, implication of non-business travel in Nigeria and the merging importance of international recreation.

 

WLM 819 - Recreation Systems Planning (2 Units)

Components of the tourism - park-recreation development system and the concepts of planning resources use at the larger-than-site scale.  Physical and programme factors important to development for visitor use.  Computer techniques for land assessment.

 

WLM 899 - Special Study: Thesis Research (Elective) 6 Units

Research projects on an approved topic leading to a dissertation.

 

WLM 897 and 898 - Seminar - 2 Units

 

7.3.11    Staff List

NAME                                   

QUALIFICATION

RANK

AREA OF

SPECIALIZATION

Adetogun, A.C.

B.Sc. M.Sc. Ph.D.(Ib.)

Reader

Head of Department/ Wood Utilization and Protection

Onadeko, S.A.

B.Sc. (Ib)., M.Sc. (Texas),

Ph.D. (Ib.)

Professor

Wildlife Management/

Park Interpretation

Oluwalana, S.A.

B.Sc., M.Sc., Ph.D. (Ib.),

Dipl. E.M.P (Dresden)

Professor

Forest Economics and

Management

Aduradola, A.M.

B.Sc. (Ib.), M.Sc. (Ib.)                           

Ph.D. (Ib.)Cert. Agroforestry

(Viterbo)

Professor

Agro-forestry and

Silviculture

Adedire, M.O.

ND (Jos), M.Sc. (Voronezh), M.Sc., Ph.D.  (Ib.) Diploma UMTCC (Rotterdam)

Professor

Forest Ecology and

Agroforestry

Adekunle, M.F.

HND (Ib.) B. For., M.F., Ph.D. (Abeokuta).

Reader

Forest Economics and

Management

Jayeola, O.A.

B.FWM; M.WM; Ph.D. (Abeokuta)

Senior Lecturer

Wildlife Ecology and Conservation

Oduntan, O.O.

B.Sc, M.Sc, Ph.D. (Ib)

Lecturer I

Wildlife Policy

Oyatogun, M.O.O.

B.Sc, M.Sc, Ph.D. (Ib)

Lecturer I

Range Management

Shotuyo, A.L.A.

B.Sc, M.Sc, Ph.D. (Ib)

 

Lecturer I

Wildlife Ecology and Management

Soaga, J.A.

B.Sc, M.Sc, (Ib) Ph.D. (Abeokuta)

Cert. TQM

Lecturer II

Forest Economics and Management

Adedokun, M.O.

B.Sc (Akure) M.F; Ph.D. (Abeokuta)

Lecturer I

Forest Economics and Management

Akintunde, O.O.

B.FWM, M.WM; Ph.D. (Abeokuta)

Lecturer I

Wildlife Management

Osunsina, I.O.O

B.FWM, M.WM; Ph.D. (Abeokuta) PGD UMTCC (Rotterdam)

Lecturer II

Wildlife Management

Oladoye, A.O.

B.FWM; M.F; Ph.D. (Abeokuta)

Lecturer II

Forest Ecology and Conservation

Ogunjobi, K.O.

B.FWM, MEMP; Ph.D. (Abeokuta)

Lecturer II

Wood Science

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